ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

Baahng Gallery is pleased to present I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX, the gallery’s inaugural solo exhibition of the highly celebrated works of Zhang Hongtu, a Chinese-born, New York-based artist and forerunner of the Chinese “Political Pop” art movement.  The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from September 27 through November 8, with an opening reception with the artist to be held on Friday, September 27, from 6 to 8 pm.  

 

To dare to mate a horse with an ox is to dare to break down the zygotic barriers that maintain the separation of species.  This notion of doing the impossible and breaking down barriers has been the lodestar of Zhang Hongtu’s life and five decade-long career.  As a Muslim outsider in China, then as a Chinese exile in America, through his works, he has continually sought to disintegrate dividing walls in culture, politics, and time.  His works involve thoughtful juxtapositions of critique with humor, and the appropriation of images of authority figures and cultural icons, for the purpose of deflating the power of such formidably divisive influences.  While each work captures and contemplates a multi-layered discourse on competing ideas, the exhibition as a whole unexpectedly proposes universality and relevancy.   

 

I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX highlights selected works from Zhang’s series Shansui, Political Pop, and Van Gogh/Bodhidharma.  Van Gogh/Bodhidharma consists of 39 ink paintings created over the course of seven years, 2007-2014.  They are the Van Gogh “self-portraits” merged into the style of the classical Zen portraits of Buddhist monk Bodhidharma.  His morphing of Van Gogh and Bodhidharma into one is a remarkable display of the artist’s masterful ability to dissolve distinctions between two icons.  Also on view are:  Bada! Bada!!-11, #2, 2011, a lopsided map of China facing a mob of angry fish; Walking Monkey, 2016, a warning on a disrupted ecosystem; Landscape, Out of the Focus, 2011, a questioning of the assumption of near-sightedness; Long Live Chairman Mao Series, 1987-1995; Zodiac Figures, 2002; Mai Dang Lao, 2002; and Six-Pack of Kekou-Kele, 2002.

 

Zhang Hongtu was born in Gansu, China, in 1943. He attended the Central Academy of Arts and Crafts in Beijing 1964-1969, moved to New York in 1982, and attended Art Students League 1982-1986.  Selected solo exhibitions include at Queens Museum, Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Kansas, the Connecticut College Charles E. Shain Library, The Bronx Museum of Fine Arts, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan.  Selected group exhibitions at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museu Picasso, Spain, Brooklyn Museum, Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio, Princeton University Art Museum, Israel Museum, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Cuba, The Hall for Contemporary Art, Hamburg, Germany, Kunst und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, Germany, and Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan.

ZHANG HONGTU

I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

 

September 27 – November 8, 2019

 

Opening reception with the artist

6-8pm, Friday September 27

 
Related:
Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

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Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

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Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
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Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

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October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

Categories: exhibitions

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Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

   

Zhang Hongtu’s works were shown at Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, October 6, 2017 – January 7, 2018.

 

Click here for Zhang Hongtu’s interview with CNN about the exhibition, from 05:58

 

http://www.cnn.com/style/article/guggenheim-art-and-china-after-1989/index.html

 

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

October 6, 2017 – January 7, 2018

Related
Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
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Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

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At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

Categories: exhibitions

Tags:

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Zhang Hongtu

 

By Savanna Maude, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNAL

 

September 22, 2018

 

Zhang Hongtu, an internationally acclaimed artist, will debut his first solo show in the Midwest on Tuesday at Kansas State University.

 

The exhibition, titled “Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu,” will be installed in the Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art through Dec. 22.

 

The exhibition brings together early and recent works highlighting Hongtu’s expressions of his hybrid cultural roots.

 

Hongtu grew up in China as a member of its Muslim minority, suffering persecution for his religion and his political beliefs under the regime of People’s Republic of China founder and Communist Party chairman Mao Zedong.

 

Hongtu traveled around China as a young artist and was heavily influenced by his study trip to Dunhuang in the western province of Gansu.

 

Dunhuang was an important stop along the network of trade routes known as the Silk Road, which connected Europe and Africa to the Middle East and Asia. Through the Silk Road, Buddhism traveled from India to China, resulting in the establishment of Buddhist cave temples around Dunhuang between the fourth and 14th centuries. The cave temples featured painting styles different from what Hongtu learned in art school and showed signs of the mural artists’ awareness of European painting.

 

In 1982, Hongtu moved to New York City to study art.

 

His works show a lifelong interest in the cycle of travel, immigration, transmission of ideas and cultural cross-pollination.

Included in the exhibit are an oil painting applying the signature style of Vincent van Gogh to a landscape scene from a famous Chinese ink painting, and a Ping Pong table that requires players to avoid letting the ball fall through cutouts in the shape of the head of Chairman Mao.

 

Hongtu will speak at K-State at the Art in Motion festival on Oct. 6. He also will speak about Buddhist cave temples along the Silk Road on Oct. 9 at the Spencer Museum of Art on the University of Kansas campus.

 

The Beach Museum of Art is free to the public, and is open from 10 a.m. to 5p.m. Wednesday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

 

Source: https://www.cjonline.com/entertainmentlife/20180922/international-artist-zhang-hongtu-debuts-first-solo-midwest-show-at-k-state

Related:
Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
October 6, 2017 - January 7, 2018
The Red Door by Zhang Hongtu

NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

September 20 - October 21, 2017
Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

Zhang Hongtu in The Masters: Art Students League Teachers and Their Students

At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

Categories: exhibitions

Tags:

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

By Megan Moser, The Mercury, Manhattan, Kansas, October 7th, 2018

 

Zhang Hongtu seemed genuinely excited to be in Manhattan on Wednesday.

 

The New York City-based artist and his wife, Miaoling, were in the Little Apple for the opening of his exhibition Culture Mixmaster, which is at K-State’s Beach Museum of Art through December. Zhang’s It’s his first solo show in the Midwest.

 

During a preview last week, Zhang, a youthful septuagenarian with white hair and trendy glasses, said he was thrilled with the way the exhibit had turned out.

 

“With this show, I didn’t come here to see the process of installation,” Zhang said, complimenting the museum’s curators. “It’s beyond my imagination. It’s still my work, but under a different concept of installation, lighting.”

 

Zhang’s work, like his life, is a blending of the East and the West.

 

Zhang grew up in China but has lived in America since the 1980s, so he’s now been in the U.S. as long as he had been in China. He likes to say he’s 100-percent Chinese and 100-percent American.

 

“When you see the show, you’ll see works that mix the tradition from Western European painting with classical Chinese painting,” curator Aileen June Wang said. “And all of his life, Hongtu has been thinking about this question and celebrating the richness of cultural exchange and cultural mixing.”

 

The pieces on display show a playful combination of influences and represent Zhang’s interest in the effects of travel and migration on culture.

 

The works include classic blue-and-white Chinese ceramics in the distinctive shape of Coke bottles, and a self-portrait that blends the styles of Pablo Picasso and Leonardo DaVinci’s “Mona Lisa.” That portrait was first made on the computer with Photoshop, and printed with an inkjet printer Wang said. Zhang later painted a version of it, so the printed version that’s on display at the Beach is actually the original, she said.

 

One entire gallery is devoted to a reimagining of Vincent Van Gogh’s 39 portraits as those of the Zen Bodhidharma.

 

Perhaps the most fun piece is an “interactive sculpture” called “Ping Pong Mao,” a table tennis table whose surface features cutout silhouettes of Chairman Mao Zedong.

On Saturday the museum staged a tournament using the table.

 

Zhang said the experience of playing on it — and trying to keep the ball from falling through the cutouts — is similar to the experience of living in China after the Cultural Revolution.

 

“The situation in China is still like this,” Zhang said. “You can criticize someone else, but not political leaders. So nothing changes, politically.”

 

He mentioned that his wife was a ping-pong champion at her school when she was a girl. Miaoling shook her head furiously, embarrassed by the attention.

 

Ping pong was an important tool in diplomatic relations between the United States in China in the 1970s. The use of the ping-pong table is another example of east-west culture exchange.

 

Zhang grew up in China as part of the Muslim minority. Because of his family’s religious and political beliefs, he said they suffered persecution under Mao, and he often felt like an outsider.

 

His family relocated many times between the Chinese Civil War and the beginning of the Cultural Revolution in 1966. At that time, he saw the political movement as edgy and was eager for change, so he supported it. He began to have doubts, though, when he saw the violence that arose from the revolution. He said he felt he had been fooled by someone he believed in.

 

He attended art school in China, where anything the students produced had to fit within the narrow scope of communist ideals, and there was a heavy emphasis on depicting Chairman Mao.

 

After college, Zhang continued to travel and immigrated to the United States in 1982 to find artistic freedom. His wife followed in 1984 with their son. Zhang and his wife now live in Woodside, Queens, a diverse neighborhood where Zhang told The New York Times “I’ve never felt like a foreigner.”

 

He got early attention for works like his 1989 “Last Banquet,” a version of “The Last Supper” that substitutes 13 Maos for Jesus and his disciples, a work that was part of a Guggenheim exhibit last year. Ironically, that piece was censored, though Zhang said.

 

Though he hasn’t lived in China for 30 years, Zhang said his view of China is still relevant today, as Mao’s influence persists. That said, he moved away from using Mao’s likeness in the 1990s.

 

Certainly the most attention-grabbing piece in the exhibition is the 45-by-12-foot “Great Wall with Gates III.”

 

Zhang made the first version of that work in 2009 for the anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

 

He made the current version especially for the Beach exhibit. It’s a digital image of the Great Wall of China altered with Photoshop to include a number of gates.

 

“I used the Great Wall not only about China, but basically about walls. Walls always divide, always stop people (from) going through,” he said. “I picked the image of the wall but with many many gates to change the function of the wall. Make it playful, not to block anymore.”

 

The exhibit’s title wall features a reproduction of a painting called Two Monkeys. Beach Museum curator Aileen June Wang said she asked Zhang whether the monkeys in the painting represented him, and he handed her a card that said, “You can ask me anything except about the monkeys,” she recalled, laughing.

 

But Wang said she and museum director Linda Duke have a theory. In Chinese literature there is a classic called “Journey to the West” about the adventures of a monkey god who accompanies a Chinese monk as he travels to India to get sutras and bring them back to China to contribute to the study of Buddhism.

 

“The journey of that monkey god is similar, or Hongtu feels some affinity, to the adventures of that character,” Wang said. Zhang smiled as she explained this but neither confirmed nor denied the hypothesis.

 

Artist talk by Zhang Hongtu

5 p.m. Tuesday

Zhang will share his experience of traveling to Dunhuang in western China, a town known as a hub of cultural exchange connecting Europe and Asia.

Source: http://themercury.com/features/zhang-s-mixmaster-exhibit-blends-his-chinese-american-backgrounds/article_ea44e03c-ad6b-53ba-9817-3a88ca17b2c1.html

Related:
Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
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The Red Door by Zhang Hongtu

NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

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Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

Zhang Hongtu in The Masters: Art Students League Teachers and Their Students

At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

Categories: exhibitions

Tags:

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

   

Zhang Hongtu’s works were shown at his solo exhibition, Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, at The Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University: September 25 –  December 22, 2018.

 

Press Release at the Beach Museum of Art.

 

Internationally acclaimed artist Zhang Hongtu has called many different places home and experienced life as an outsider at different times. Hegrew up in China as a member of the Muslim minority and because of his religious and political backgrounds, suffered persecution during the regime of Chinese Communist Party founder Mao Zedong. In 1982, he moved to New York City to study art and start a new life. This large exhibition, the first solo show of the artist in the Midwest, brings together early and up-to-the-minute recent works highlighting the artist’s endeavors in expressing his hybrid cultural roots.

 

Zhang’s travels around China as a young artist, most especially his study trip to Dunhuang in the western province of Gansu, proved seminal to his development. Dunhuang was an important stop along the network of trade routes known as the Silk Road, which connected Europe and Africa to the Middle East and Asia. Through the Silk Road, Buddhism traveled from India to China, resulting in the establishment of Buddhist cave temples around Dunhuang between the fourth and fourteenth centuries. The cave temples featured painting styles different from what Zhang had learned in art school and showed signs of the mural artists’ awareness of European painting.Works on display at “Culture Mixmaster” demonstrate Zhang’s lifelong interest in the cycle of travel, immigration, transmission of ideas, and cultural cross-pollination. Included are an oil painting applying the signature style of Vincent van Gogh to a landscape scene from a famous Chinese ink painting, and a ping-pong table that requires players to avoid letting the ball fall through cut-outs in the shape of the head of Chairman Mao.

 

Major support for this exhibition is provided by a grant from the Greater Manhattan Community Foundation’s Lincoln & Dorothy I. Deihl Community Grant Program, with additional sponsorship by Anderson Bed & Breakfast and Terry and Tara Cupps.

 

Source: https://beach.k-state.edu/explore/exhibitions/culture-mixmaster.html

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu

The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University

September 25 – December 22, 2018

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Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
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Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
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Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

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At Hirschl & Adler Modern
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Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
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Categories: exhibitions

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NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

Baahng Gallery is pleased to present TWO ROCKS, an exhibition for artists Nobuo Sekine and Zhang Hongtu.  The exhibition will showcase a selection of their paintings, sculptures, and multi-media installations, from the 1980’s and 1990’s.  The exhibition will run from September 20th through October 21, 2017.

 

TWO ROCKS showcases the work of modern sages, Nobuo Sekine and Zhang Hongtu, from the 1980’s and 1990’s, pivotal years in their contributions to art.  Sekine is a key founder of Mono-ha, a group of artists that gained prominence in Tokyo in the late 1960’s for their rejection of the traditional ideas of representation.  Primarily known as a sculptor, Sekine incorporates natural and industrial materials in his work, and his work explores the properties and interdependency of these materials with their surrounding space.  In the late 1980’s, he returned to his original training as a painter, and began creating Phase Conception – a series of “paintings” of phases.  The phases are made out of thick Japanese handmade paper, cut out, torn, pasted back onto the remaining surface and coated with either gold leaf or black lead.  They are based on a topological geometry concept as applied to space, which is that the continuous transformation of form does not affect the sum total of the form’s mass.  Concurrently, in the late 1980’s, Zhang, a forerunner of Political Pop Art, immigrated to New York where he would discover Pop Art against the geo-political backdrop of the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre.  Zhang is known for using various painting styles and media to produce artistic critiques of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, including through his appropriating images of Mao Zedong.  His newer works have branched into environmental concerns, and include his classical Chinese landscape paintings, which, traditionally painted in black-and-white, are added with sensuous, toxic colors. 

 

Born in 1942 in Saitama prefecture, Japan, Nobuo Sekine has been recognized for his artistic breakthroughs, including at the 1968 Contemporary Sculpture Exhibition in Kobe for his work: Phase – Mother Earth, and at the 1970 Venice Biennial for his work: Phase of Nothingness.  His works have been exhibited internationally, including at Guggenheim Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Haus der Kunst in Germany, and Museum of Modern Art in New York.  TWO ROCKS will feature Sekine’s Phase Conception paintings, including Flower, Spring Sea, and From Inside a Semicircle.

 

Born in 1943 in Pingliang, China, Zhang Hongtu is the recipient of awards, including from the Pollock Krasner Foundation in 1991 and the National Endowment for Arts in 1995.  His works have been exhibited internationally, including at Bronx Museum, Kaohsiung Museum in Taiwan, Museu Picasso in Spain, Queens Museum, The Deichtorhallen in Germany, Israel Museum, and Metropolitan Museum of Art.  Guggenheim Museum in New York will showcase Zhang Hongtu’s Vitrine, 1986-1995 in the upcoming exhibition “Art and China After 1989: Theater of the World.”   TWO ROCKS will feature paintings, sculptures, and multi-media installations by Zhang, including Self-Portrait in the Style of the Old Masters, The Red Door, and Re-Make of Ma Yuan’s Water Album (780 Years Later).

September 20 – October 21, 2017

 

Opening reception:

Wednesday, September 20th, 2017

6-8pm

 

Artists in the exhibition

Nobuo Sekine

Zhang Hongtu

Related:

Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
October 6, 2017 - January 7, 2018
The Red Door by Zhang Hongtu

NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

September 20 - October 21, 2017
Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

Zhang Hongtu in The Masters: Art Students League Teachers and Their Students

At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

Categories: exhibitions

Tags:

ZHANG HONGTU

Zhang Hongtu

Zhang Hongtu was born in Pingliang, China, moved to New York City in 1982. He works in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, collage, ceramics, digital imaging, and installations. From the mid-1980s to the mid-1990s, Zhang created paintings, sculpture and mixed media installations using the image of Mao Zedong to express his ideas about Communist China and the Culture Revolution (1966-1976). In the past decade, his works began to question the complex relationships between the traditions of old China and the West today, as seen in his large-format Shan Shui paintings, among other works. More recently, his works have focused on the relationship between nature and the human condition.

 

Zhang has exhibited extensively across the U.S. and abroad. Recent shows include Princeton University Art Museum; Museu Picasso in Barcelona, Spain; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; The Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, Guggenheim Museum New York and a retrospective at Queens Museum in New York.

 

Education           

1982-1986         Art Students League, New York, NY, USA

1964-1969         Central Academy of Arts and Crafts, Beijing, China

1960-1964         High School Attached to the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China

Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 8, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
October 6, 2017 - January 7, 2018
The Red Door by Zhang Hongtu

NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

September 20 - October 21, 2017
Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

Zhang Hongtu in The Masters: Art Students League Teachers and Their Students

At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

2018 Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS

2015 Zhang Hongtu, Queens Museum, New York, USA

The Journey Begins: Zhang Hongtu 1985‐2004, Tina Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

2013 On the Road — Zhang Hongtu’s Artistic Journey, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

2011 Zhang Hongtu: Shan Shui Today, Tina Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

2007 Zhang Hongtu Recent Paintings, Lin & Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

2006 Four Seasons: Earth Above and Heaven Below, Lehigh University, PA, USA

2005 Recent Paintings by Zhang Hongtu, Goedhuis Contemporary, New York City, USA

2004 Zhang Hongtu: Selected Works — Visiting Artist Program at Marlboro College, William Holland & Drury Jr. Gallery, Marlboro College, VT, USA

Zhang Hongtu: Dialogue with the Taipei Palace Museum, Lin & Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

2003 Icon & Innovations: The Cross-Cultural Art of Zhang Hongtu, The Gibson Gallery, State University of New York at Potsdam, New York City, USA

2000 New Paintings, Cheryl McGinnis Gallery, New York City, USA

1999 Repaint Chinese Shan Shui Painting, Yale-China Association, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

1998 Zhang Hongtu, New Works, Cheryl McGinnis Gallery, New York City, USA

1996 Reflections Abroad: the Journey of Zhang Hongtu 1982-1996, Anthony Giordano Gallery, Oakdale, NY, USA

Soy Sauce, Lipstick, Charcoal, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China

Chairmen Mao, Groton School, Groton, MA, USA

1995 Zhang Hongtu: Material Mao, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York City, USA

1993 Material Mao, Gallery 456, Chinese American Arts Council, New York City, USA

1992 The Angel’s Ghost, Webster Hall, New York City, USA

1985 In the Spirit of Dunhuang, Adams House, Harvard University, MA, USA

1984 In the Spirit of Dunhuang, Asian Arts Institute, New York City, USA

Zhang Hongtu — Recent New York Works, Hammerquist Gallery, New York City, USA

2018 Nobuo Sekine, Zhang Hongtu: Two Rocks, Baahng Gallery, New York, NY

2017 Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, NY, USA

Self-Reimagined, Visual Arts Gallery, New Jersey City University, Jersey City, NJ, USA

Embrace or Rebel? Traditional Asian Art Techniques in Contemporary Practice, 

Amelie A. Wallace Gallery, SUNY College at Old Westbury, NY, USA

2016 A Brief History of Humankind, Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, Germany

2015 China: Through the Looking Glass, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA

After Picasso: 80 Contemporary Artists, Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio, USA

Wild Noise: Artwork from the Bronx Museum, El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana, Cuba

A Brief History of Humankind, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel

Picasso in Contemporary Art, The Hall for Contemporary Art, Deichtorhallen, Hamburg, Germany

2014 Oil and Water: Reinterpreting Ink, Museum of Chinese in America, New York City, USA

Post-Picasso: Contemporary Reactions, Museu Picasso, Barcelona, Spain

2013 Inspired by Dunhuang: Re-Creation in Contemporary Chinese Art, China Institute, New York City, USA

Abu Dhabi Art 2013, Manarat Al Saadiyat, Saadiyat Cultural District, Abu Dhabi, UAE

2012 Abu Dhabi Art 2012, Manarat Al Saadiyat, Saadiyat Cultural District, Abu Dhabi, UAE

2011 ShContemporary, Shanghai Exhibition Center, Shanghai, China

TINA KENG GALLERY BEIJING, Tina Keng Gallery, Beijing, China

East Meets West, Foster Gallery, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, WI, USA

2010 Urban Archives: Happy Together, Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York City, USA

East/West: Visual Speaking, Paul and Hillard University Art Museum, University of Louisiana, Lafayette, LA, USA

2009 Here & Now: Chapter II Crossing Boundaries, Museum of Chinese in America, New York City

R/evolution, Tina Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

Tear down this Wall, National Art Club, New York City, USA

Mythologies of Contemporary Art by Three Artists: Yang Mao-Lin, Zhang Hongtu and Tu Wei-Cheng, Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taipei, Taiwan

Outside In: Chinese + American + Contemporary + Art, Princeton University Art Museum, New Jersey, NJ, USA

Art, Archive, and Activism: Martin Wong’s Downtown Crossing, 7th Floor Gallery, Asian/Pacific/American Institute at New York University, New York City, USA

2008 Reason’s Clue, Lin & Keng Gallery, Beijing; Queens Museum of Art, Queens, NY, USA

  Back to the Garden: Daily Life to Spiritual Vision, Crossing Art Gallery, Queens, NY, USA

   New Year Exhibition Opening Ceremony – Space B, Lin & Keng Gallery, Taipei, Taiwan

2007 Grand Opening Exhibition, Lin & Keng Gallery, Beijing, China

  Made in China, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark

2006 On the Edge: Contemporary Chinese Artists Encounter the West, Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley, MA; Indianapolis Museum of Art, IN, USA

  Dragon Veins, Contemporary Art Museum, University of South Florida, FL, USA

   Travelers Between Cultures, Visual Arts Center of New Jersey, Summit, NJ, USA

  Antiquity Modernity: Breaking Traditions, Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, New York City, USA

New Chinese Occidentalism, Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, New York City, USA

2005 The Way to China is the Way to America, Ji Dachun/Zhang Hongtu, Plum Blossoms Gallery, New York City, USA

   Trading Place, Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei, Taipei, Taiwan

On the Edge, Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, CA, USA

2004 Reinventing Tradition in a New World: The Arts of Gu Wenda, Wang Mansheng, Xu Bing, and Zhang Hongtu, Schmucker Art Gallery, Gettysburg, PA, USA

Out of Time, Out of Place, Out of China: Reinventing Chinese Tradition in a New Century, University of Pittsburgh Art Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

2003 BQE, White Box, New York City, USA

A Brush With History: Contemporary Artists and Chinese Tradition,Newark Museum, NJ, USA

  Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered, Princeton University Art Museum, NJ, USA

2002 Guangzhou Triennial, Guangzhou, China

All Access, CPC Gallery, New York City, USA

   Paris-Pékin, Espace Cardin, Paris, France

AJITA-Unconquerable, the Station, Houston, TX, USA

   ConversASIAN, National Gallery, Cayman Islands

   In Memory, the Art of Afterward, Sidney Mishkin Gallery, New York City, USA

   Queens International, Queens Museum of Art, Queens, NY, USA

2001 Cross+Overs, Market Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa

   Unknow-Infinity, Taipei Gallery, New York City, USA

   China Without Borders, Sotheby’s Gallery, New York City, USA

2000 Lineage, d.u.m.b.o. Arts Center, New York City, USA

  Crossing the Line, CSPS, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA

   Word and Meaning, University at Buffalo Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, USA

   Conceptual Ink, Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, New York City, USA

1999 TRANSIENCE, Chinese Experimental Art at the End of the Twentieth Century, Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, IL; University of Oregon Museum of Art, Eugene, OR; the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, USA

1998 Global Roots: Chinese Artists Working in New York, Purdue University, IN, USA

   Kunming, New York, Montréal, OBSERVATOIRE 4, Quebec, Canada

1997 Kimchi Xtravaganza!, Korean American Museum, Los Angeles, CA, USA

1996 Icons of Power, Eighth Floor Gallery, New York City, USA

1995 Body Language, Jamaica Arts Center, NY, USA

   Other Choices/Other Voices, Islip Museum, Long Island, NY, USA

Between East and West, The Discovery Museum, Bridgeport, CT, USA

1994 Small World-Small Works, Galerie + Edition Caoc, Berlin, Germany

The Fifth Biennial of Havana, Havana, Cuba

Ad-Vance, Pfizer Corp. N.Y., curated by the Museum of Modern Art, NY, USA

   Beyond the Borders: Art by Recent Immigrants, Bronx Museum of the Arts, NY, USA

  China June 4th 1989, Buckham Gallery, Flint, MI, USA

1993 Teddy Bear, Potato, Lipstick and Mao, Art in General, New York City, USA

Word!, Jamaica Arts Center, NY, USA

Reflections for Peace, Mexic-Arte Museum, Austin, TX, USA

   The Curio Shop, Artists Space, New York City, USA

1992 Four Artists from China, American Museum of Natural History, New York City, USA

   China June 4th 1989, Cleveland Institute of Art, OH, USA

China June 4th 1989, Mexic-Arte Museum, Austin, TX, USA

1991 From ‘Star Star’ to Avant Garde-Nine Artists from China, Asian American Art Center, New York City, USA

   Changing Cultures, Hamilton College and Baruch College, New York City, USA

   Dismantling Invisibility, Art in General, New York City, USA

   Syncretism, Alternative Museum, New York City, USA

1990 Selection, Artists Space, New York City, USA

  Harvest 2001, Aljira Center for Contemporary Art, NJ, USA

   The Decade Show (with the Epoxy Group), New Museum, New York, NY, USA

   China June 4th 1989, PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York City, USA

1989 China June 4th 1989, Blum Helman Warehouse, NY, USA

   Uptown/Downtown, City Gallery, New York City, USA

Fusion Art, Ludwig Museum, Köln, Germany

1988 Thirty-Six Tactics, Alternative Museum, New York City, USA

   Eight Artists from China, The Palladium, New York City, USA

1987 Epoxy Slide Exhibition, Red Dot Outdoor Theater, New York City, USA

   Artists from China — New Expressions, Sarah Lawrence College, NY, USA

1986 Roots to Reality II, Henry Street Settlement, New York City, USA

1985 Roots to Reality I, Henry Street Settlement, New York City, USA

1984 The New Generation, Hammerquist Gallery, New York City, USA

1983 Eye to Eye, Asian Arts Institute, New York City, USA

Kaminokawa Modern Art Exhibition, Yokohama, Japan

   Painting the Chinese Dream, Brooklyn Museum, NY and City Hall, Boston, MA, USA

1982 Faces of China, American International College, Springfield, MA, USA

1980 Contemporary Artists, Beijing, China

Books

Lee and Silbergeld, ZHANG HONGTU, Expanding Visions of Shrinking World

DUKE University Press and Queens Museum

Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts. On the Road: Zhang Hongtu’s Artistic Journey. Kaohsiung: Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, 2013.

The Ten Ox-Herding Pictures: Chan Master Kuo-an Shih-yuan, Song Dynasty, Reproduced by Zhang Hongtu. Taipei: TKG Foundation for Arts & Culture, 2014.

Zhang, Hongtu, and Jerome Silbergeld. Zhang Hongtu: An On-going Painting Project. New York: On-going Publications, 2000.

Zhang Hongtu: The Art Of Straddling Boundaries. Taipei: Lin & Keng Gallery, Inc., 2007.

 

Chapters or Sections of Books

Andrews, Julia F., and Kuiyi Shen. “No U-turn: Chinese Art after 1989.” In The Art Of Modern China, 257–77. Los Angeles: The Regent of the University of California, 2012.

Barmé, Geremie R. Shades of Mao: The Posthumous Cult of the Great Leader, 46, 215. New York: M. E. Sharpe, Inc., 1996.

Barmé, Geremie R., and Linda Jaivin. Introduction to New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices, xxvi. New York: Times Books, 1992.

Callahan, William A. “Gender, Democracy and Representation: Asian Revolutionary Images.” In Gendering the International, edited by Louiza Odysseos and Hakan Seckinelgin, 167–68. New York: Millennium, 2002.

Clarke, David. “Reframing Mao: Aspects of Recent Chinese Art, Popular Culture and Politics.” In Art & Place: Essays on Art from a Hong Kong Perspective, 236–49. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 1996.

Chang, Alexandra. “Once More: Is There An Asian American Aesthetic?” In Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Arts Collectives, 98–109. Beijing: Timezone 8 Limited, 2009.

Chang, Arnold. “From Fengshui to Fractals: A User’s Guide to Chinese Landscape Painting.” In ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art, 33–61. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Chiu, Melissa. “An Expanded Chinese Art History: Internationalization of the Chinese Art World.” In Asian Art History: In the Twenty-First Century, edited by Vishakha N. Desai, 224. Williamstown: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, 2007.

———. “Theories of Being Outside.” In Breakout: Chinese Art Outside China, 8, 18, 39–72, 113, 212. Milan: Charta, 2006.

Clarke, David. “Revolutions in Vision: Chinese Art and the Experience of Modernity.” In The Cambridge Companion to Modern Chinese Culture, 292–94. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Cohen, Joan Lebold. “Groups: Contemporaries.” In The New Chinese Painting: 1949–1986, 77. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1987.

Delue, Rachael Z. “Neither Here Nor There: China, Global Culture, and the End of American Art.” In ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art, 257. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2010.

Dutton, Michael. Streetlife China, 162–63, 172, 174, 241, 262–65. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Hallmark, Kara Kelly. “Zhang Hongtu.” In Encyclopedia of Asian American Artists: Artists of the American Mosaic, 261–65. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2007.

Hay, Jonathan. “Zhang Hongtu / Hongtu Zhang: An Interview.” In Boundaries in China, 280–98. London: Reaktion Books, 1994.

He, Xin. “Wheels: What’s New?” In New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices, 409. New York: Times Books, 1992.

Huot, Claire. “China’s Avant-Garde Art: Differences in the Family.” In China’s New Cultural Scene: A Handbook of Changes, 126–41. Durham: Duke University Press, 2000.

Kwon, Sowon. “Potatoes, Teddy Bears, Lipsticks, and Mao.” In Art in General Manual 1993–1994. New York: Art In General, Inc., 1994.

Lao, She. “Wheels: A Big Confucius and Little Emiles.” In New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices, 404. New York: Times Books, 1992.

Lim, Michelle. “Cultural Iconography as Style.” In Outside In: Chinese x American x Contemporary Art, 270–81. New Jersey: Princeton University Art Museum, 2009.

Lin, Xiaoping. “Globalism or Nationalism?” In Children of Marx and Coca-Cola: Chinese Avant-Garde Art and Independent Cinema, 72. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2009.

———. “Globalism or Nationalism?” In Global Visual Cultures: An Anthology, 9–26. West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.

Liu, Changhan. The Chinese Overseas Art Icons of The 100 Years, 150–51. Taipei: Artist Publication, 2000.

Liu, Xiaobo. “Wheels: On Solitude.” In New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices, 384. New York: Times Books, 1992. 

McCausland, Shane. Introduction and Epilogue in Zhao Mengfu: Calligraphy and Painting for Khubilai’s China, 3, 333–37. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2011.

Mittler, Barbara. “Mao Wherever You Go: The Art of Repetition in Revolutionary China.” In A Continuous Revolution: Making Sense of Cultural Revolution Culture, 298, 299, 300–1, 311, 326–27, 306, 315. London: Harvard University Asia Center, 2012.

Ngai, Jimmy S. Y., “The Cry: Tiananmen Days.” In New Ghosts, Old Dreams: Chinese Rebel Voices, 76, 93. New York: Times Books, 1992.

Purtle, Jennifer. “Whose Hobbyhorse?: Loading the Deck.” In Chinese Landscape Painting as Western Art History, 5–8. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2010.

Schell, Orville. Mandate of Heaven: A New Generation of Entrepreneurs, Dissidents, Bohemians, and Technocrats Lays Claim to China’s Future, 290–91. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.

Silbergeld, Jerome. “An Outsider’s Outsider Comes In.” In Outside In: Chinese x American x Contemporary Art, 257–69. New Jersey: Princeton University Art Museum, 2009.

———. “Facades: The New Beijing and Unsettled Ecology of Jia Zhangke’s The World.” In Chinese Ecocinema: In the Age of Environmental Challenge, edited by Sheldon H. Lu and Jiayan Mi, 122. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2009.

———. “The Space Between: Cross-Cultural Encounters in Contemporary Chinese Art.” In Xu Bing and Contemporary Chinese Art: Cultural and Philosophical, edited by Hsingyuan Tsao and Roger T. Ames, 177–98. New York: State University of New York Press, 2011.

Sullivan, Michael. Art and Artists of Twentieth Century China, 232, 271. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1996.

Tam, Vivienne. “MAO ART: Interview with Zhang Hongtu.” In China Chic, 92–4. New York: HarperCollins, 1999.

Tu, Thuy Linh Nguyen. “Material Mao: Fashion Histories Out of Icons.” In The Beautiful Generation: Asian Americans and the Cultural Economy of Fashion, 145–48, 156–64. Durham: Duke University Press, 2011.

Valjakka, Minna. “Parodying Mao: Earliest Existing Caricatures of Mao.” In Many Faces of Mao Zedong, 170. Helsinki: University of Helsinki, 2011.

Vine, Richard. “The Scene Now: Chapter 6.” In New China New Art, 198, 199, 206. New York: Prestel, 2008.

Yang, Alice. “Review: A Group Show: We Are the Universe.” In Why Asia?: Contemporary Asian and Asian American Art, 62. New York: New York University Press, 1998.

Zhang, Hongtu. “Blurring the Boundary Between Yesterday and Today, for Tomorrow. In ARTiculations: Undefining Chinese Contemporary Art, edited by Jerome Silbergeld and Dora C. Y. Ching, 212–31. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2010.

———. “Live to Tell: I Don’t Want to Do Anything Pure.” In Transculturalism: How the World Is Coming Together, edited by Claude Grunitzky with Trace Magazine Contributors, 236–37. New York: True Agency, 2004.

 

Journal Articles 

ART/LIFE Doubletree by Hilton Hotel Boston-Downtown 241. Ventura: ARTLIFE, 2002.

“The Black Hole Art of Zhang Hongtu.” Postcolonial Studies 2, no. 2 (1999): 121, 165–69.

Bordeleau, Erik. “Le Political Pop: Un Art Profanatoire?” Etc.: Revue de l’Art Actuel 91 (2010–11): 21–25.

Boucher, Madeleine. “Beyond Pop: Imagery and Appropriation in Contemporary Chinese Art.” Columbia East Asia Review vol. 2 (2009): 37–55.

Callahan, William A. “Vision of Gender and Democracy: Revolutionary Photo Albums in Asia.” Journal of International Studies, vol. 27, no. 4 (1998): 1031–60.

Cline, Rob. “Mao Isn’t Just for Breakfast Anymore.” Icon (June 8, 2000).

Cohn, Don J. “Cultural Imports: Sotheby’s Brings Chinese Contemporary Art to New York.” Art Asia Pacific 48 (2006): 56–7.

Cornand, Brigitte. “Around the World.” Art Press International Edition 185 (1993): 69.

Dudek, Ingrid. “Mao in Contemporary Chinese Art.” Andy Warhol’s Mao, auction catalog (New York: Christie’s, 2006). 

Erickson, Britta. “The Contemporary Artistic Deconstruction—and Reconstruction—of Brush and Ink Painting.” Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art vol. 2, no. 2 (2003): 82–9.

“Face of Protest.” US News & World Report (September 18, 1989): 13.

Fang, Lizhi, and Richard Dicker. “Portraits of Oppression: A Leading Dissident Decries the Continued Atrocities in China.” The Sciences vol. 32, issue 5 (1992): 16–21.

Goodman, Jonathan. “Exhibition Review: Zhang Hongtu at the Bronx Museum of the Arts.” Asia-Pacific Sculpture News vol. 2, no. 2 (1996): 57–8.

———. “How Chinese Is It?” Architrave: A Journal of the Arts (1997): 43–6.

———. “Shuffling the Deck.” Art AsiaPacific 38 (2003): 84–5.

———. “Zhang Hongtu.”Art AsiaPacific 15 (1997): 91.

Hay, Jonathan. “Ambivalent Icons.” Orientations (July 1992).

Hollow, Michele C. “Access to Art.” Summit Magazine Holiday Issue (2006): 44–9. 

Hunter, Felicia. “Exhibit Features Works of Chinese Artist Who Mixed Western and Eastern Styles and Symbols.” Yale Bulletin and Calendar vol. 28, no. 7 (1999). 

Jacoby, Russell. “Whither Marxism?” Transition: An International Review 69 (1996): 100–15.

Kaylan, Melik. “Dealer’s Choice.” House and Garden (April 1999): 92.

Kelley, Robin D. G., and Betsy Esch. “Black Like Mao: Red China and Black Revolution.” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture, and Society vol. 1, no. 4 (1999): 8–11. 

Kumagai, Isako. “Chinese Artists in New York.” Bulletin of Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo 9 (2003): 15–16.

———. “Zhang Hongtu and Ji Yunfei, Chinese Artists in New York City.” Saitama University Review vol. 46 (2010): 79–88.

Lago, Francesca Dal. “Personal Mao: Reshaping an Icon in Contemporary Chinese Art.” Art Journal vol. 58, no. 2 (1999): 54.

Lee, Robert. “Editorial.” Artspiral vol. 6 (1992): 3.

Levin, Gail. “Changing Cultures: The Recent Immigration of Chinese Artists to the U.S.” Asian Art News vol. 4, no. 5 (1994): 70–73.

———. “Immigrant Artists from China at Baruch College Gallery.” Art Times (May 1991): 10–11.

Lin, Edward. “Censored!” Transpacific (June 1994): 58–61.

Marcus, David. “The Museum Takes on the Museum: Art Exhibition Offers New Perspectives on Familiar Works.” Princeton Alumni Weekly (March 26, 2003).

Newman, Cathy. “Culture: Mao Now.” National Geographic vol. 213, no. 5 (2008): 100–1.

Ng, Elaine W. “Artists on Spirituality.” Art Asia Pacific 51 (2007): 91.

Pappas, Ben. “Boppa um Mao Mao.” Forbes (January 26, 1998).

Pollack, Barbara. “China’s Desert Treasure.” Art News vol. 112, no. 11 (2013): 74–81.

Schell, Orville. “Once Again, Long Live Chairman Mao.” Atlantic (December 1992).

Shen, Kuiyi. “Landscape as Cultural Consciousness in Contemporary Chinese Art.” Yishu: Journal of Contemporary Chinese Art vol. 2, no. 4 (2003): 33–40.

“Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered.” Asian Art: The Newspaper for Collectors, Dealers, Museums and Galleries (March 2003).

Snow, Crocker. “Graphic Expressions of Protest.” The World Paper (October 1989). 

Takahashi, Corey. “Art Imitates Queens Life—Museum Exhibit Mixes Global Spirit and Local Diversity.” Newsday (September 20, 2002).

Tallmer, Jerry. “Chinese Works Bound & Unbound for Glory.” New York Post (May 10, 1991).

Weyburn, Jennifer A. “Drawing on East and West.” The Yale-China Review Centennial Issue, vol. 7, no. 3 (2002): 10–15.

Wojciechowski, Leigh Ann. “Chinese Artists: Reinventing Tradition.” Pitt Magazine (Fall 2004): 3–4.

Wu, Hung. “Afterword: ‘Hong Kong 1997’—T-shirt Designs by Zhang Hongtu.” Public Culture vol. 9, no. 3 (1997): 417–25.

Yang, Alice. “Group Show at Haenah-Kent Gallery.” Asian Art News vol. 4, no. 2 (1994): 94–5.

Zhu, Lillian. “Zhang Hongtu.” Asian Voices: Destiny vol. 7 (1994): 26–30.

 

Newspaper Articles

Alonso, Nathalie. “Back to the Garden: Daily Life to Spiritual Vision.” Queens Chronicle, April 17, 2008.

“Artist Famed for Mao’s Image Visits Hong Kong.” Hong Kong Standard, April 24, 1996.

Bischoff, Dan. “Making It Big: Summit Gallery Spotlights Massive Culture-Blending Creations by the China-born.” The Star-Ledger, September 29, 2006.

“Bridging the Cultural Gap.” The Citizen, January 15, 2001.

Cheung, Denise. “Art Meets Science in Bold Exhibition.” South China Morning Post, May 9, 1996.

Cotter, Holland. “Art in Review.” New York Times, June 22, 2001. 

Cullinan, Helen. “A Great Wall of Protest: ‘China 1989’ Exhibit Speaks Tellingly on Human Rights.” The Plain Dealer, August 27, 1992.

Dao, James. “From Shanghai to Soho: For Chinese Expatriates, It’s Art for Heart’s Sake.” Daily News, October 29, 1989.

———. “Lady in Square Reborn: Student Symbol to Stand in N.Y.” Daily News, June 8, 1989.

D’Arcy, David. “Artist’s Pointed Critique Is Barred from Beijing.” Wall Street Journal, August 21, 2008.

Dunning, Jennifer. “The Dance: ‘Silk Road,’ by Miss Yung.” New York Times, April 8, 1984.

Fisher, Harry. “East Meets West in Color.” The Morning Call, April 7, 2006.

Francia, Luis H. “Tiananmen Show Gutted.” Village Voice, July 31, 1990.

Genocchio, Benjamin. “Sampling the Diverse Output of Artists from China: An Exhibition in Summit Touches on Issues of Identity and Culture Shock.” New York Times, October 15, 2006.

Glueck, Grace. “Art in Review.” New York Times, April 29, 2005.

Harrison, Helen A. “A Painter’s Images of Mao as Reflected in a Changing China.” New York Times, November 10, 1996.

———. “ ‘This Is Long Island,’ Without Any Automobiles or People.” New York Times, April 16, 1995.

Hernandez, Barbara. “East Meets West in Baruch Art Gallery.” Ticker Perspectives, May 8, 1991.

Johnson, Ken. “A Pluralist Exhibition in the Plural Borough.” New York Times, August 23, 2002.

Johnson, Patricia C. “The Station Offers ‘Space’ for Humanistic Self-Expression.” Houston Chronicle, September 14, 2002.

Lee, Robert. “Zhang Hongtu.” Village Voice Art Issue, Spring 1989.

Lovelace, Carey. “Memories of Mao: An Emigré Focuses on the Chairman.” Newsday, November 8, 1996.

Mangaliman, Jessie. “Brushes Wielded Against Terror at Home.” New York Newsday, June 23, 1989.

Mimoni, Victor G. “Flushing Art Show Makes Smiles Bloom.” Queens Courier, March 13, 2008.

Morano, Marylou. “Chinese Artists Travel Between Cultures at VACNJ.” The Westfield Leader And The Scotch Plains—Fanwood TIMES, October 5, 2006.

“Newton Display Driven by Notion of Art for All.” Sunday Independent, January 21, 2001.

Parris, Sharon. “Changing Culture: Chinese Artists.” The Reporter, May 1991.

Pellett, Gail. “Mao’s Scorched Flowers Go West: Is There Art After Liberation?” Village Voice, May 13, 1986. 

“Ping-Pong with Chairman Mao.” The Gazette, May 5, 2000. 

Raven, Arlene. “Days with Art.” Village Voice, October 5, 1993.

Sand, Olivia. “Profile: Zhang Hongtu.” Asian Art: the Newspaper for Collectors, Dealers, Museums and Galleries, January 2011.

Schwendener, Martha. “Centuries Apart, Cultures Speak to Each Other.” New York Times, August 12, 2012.

“Spirit of Tiananmen Square.” Akron Beacon Journal, August 30, 1992.

Sugarman, Raphael. “Art Across Cultures.” Daily News, April 4, 1994.

Vogel, Carol. “A New Art Capital, Finding Its Own Voice.” New York Times, December 7, 2014.

Weiss, Birti. “Alle Eksisterer for Min Skyld.” Weekendavisen Boger, June 17–23, 2005.

Zimmer, William. “Statement from the Chinese After Tiananmen Square.” New York Times, November 6, 1994.

 

Exhibition Catalogues

Solo 

Dialogue With the Taipei Palace Museum: Zhang Hongtu Solo Exhibition. Taipei: Lin & Keng Gallery, 2004.

Icons & Innovations: The Cross-Cultural Art of Zhang Hongtu. New York: The Gibson Gallery, 2003.

In the Spirit of Dunhuang: Studies by Zhang Hongtu. New York: Asian Arts Institute, 1984.

Recent Paintings by Zhang Hongtu. New York: Goedhuis Contemporary, 2005.

Zhang Hongtu: Material Mao. New York: The Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1996.

Zhang Hongtu: Recent Paintings. Taipei: Lin & Keng Gallery, 2007.

Zhang Hongtu: Shan Shui Today. Taipei: Tina Keng Gallery, 2011.

Group 

AJITA. Houston: INERI Foundation, 2002.

Art and China’s Revolution. New York: Asia Society, 2008.

The Art of Justice: Part II. White Plains: Krasdale Gallery, 1995.

Artists from China—New Expressions. New York: Sarah Lawrence College Art Gallery, 1987.

Back to the Garden: Daily Life to Spiritual Vision. New York: Crossing Art, 2008.

Beyond the Borders: Art by Recent Immigrants. New York: The Bronx Museum of the Arts, 1994.

Changing Cultures: Immigrant Artists from China. New York: Baruch College, City University of New York, 1992.

CHINA June 4, 1989: An Art Exhibition. Flint: Buckham Gallery, 1994.

China Onward: The Estella Collection—Chinese Contemporary Art, 1966–2006. Denmark: Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, 2007.

China Without Borders: An Exhibition of Chinese Contemporary Art. New York: Goedhuis Contemporary, 2001.

Chinese Painting Collection of Guy Ullens de Schooten. Beijing: The Palace Museum, 2002.

Collection Remix. New York: The Bronx Museum of the Arts, 2005.

Contemporary Art: Travel Diary. Montreal: Galerie Observatoire 4, 1998.

Contemporary Combustion: Chinese Artists in America. New Britain: New Britain Museum of American Art, 2007.

The Decade Show: Frameworks of Identity in the 1980s. New York: Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art, The New Museum of Contemporary Art, and The Studio Museum in Harlem, 1990.

Dragon Veins. Tampa: Contemporary Art Museum at University of South Florida, 2006.

East/West: Visually Speaking. Lafayette: Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, 2010.

Exhibition of Chinese American Artists. Taipei: American Institute in Taiwan, 2000.

Global Roots: Artists from China Working in New York. West Lafayette: Purdue University, 1998.

Godzilla: The Asian American Arts Network. New York: Artists Space, 1993.

Here + Now: Chinese Artists in New York. New York: Museum of Chinese in America, 2009.

Hypallage: the Post-Modern Mode of Chinese Contemporary Art. Shenzhen: OCT Art & Design Gallery, 2008.

In Memory—the Art of Afterward: An International Exhibition of Works Reflecting on Loss and Remembrance. New York: The Legacy Project, 2002.

Inspired by Dunhuang: Re-creation in Contemporary Chinese Art. New York: China Institute, 2013.

Inter Mediate: Selected Contemporary Chinese American Art. New Jersey: The College of New Jersey Art Gallery, 2011.

Kimchi Xtravaganza!: A Multidisciplinary Showcase About Kimchi. Los Angeles: Korean American Museum, 1998.

Mythologies of Contemporary Art by Three Artists: Zhang Hongtu, Yang Maolin and Tu Weicheng. Taipei: Taipei Fine Arts Museum, 2009.

New Chinese Occidentalism: Chinese Contemporary Art in New York. New York: Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, 2005.

Oil & Water: Reinterpreting Ink. New York: Museum of Chinese in America, 2014.

On the Edge: Contemporary Art from Indonesia and China. Jakarta: The Pakubuwono Residence/Bank Mandiri PRIORITAS, 2004.

On the Edge: Contemporary Chinese Artists Encounter the West. Stanford: Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Center for Visual Arts, 2006.

Out of Time, Out of Place, Out of China: Reinventing Chinese Tradition in a New Century. Pittsburgh: The University Art Gallery, University of Pittsburgh, 2005.

Outside In: Chinese x American x Contemporary Art. New Jersey: Princeton University Art Museum, 2009.

Paris-Pékin. Paris: Chinese Century, Ullens and Asiart Archive, 2002.

The Pavilion of Realism. Beijing: Other Gallery, 2010.

Post-Mao Dreaming: Chinese Contemporary Art. Massachusetts: Smith College Museum of Art, 2009.

Post-Picasso: Contemporary Reactions. Barcelona: Museu Picasso, 2014.

Reason’s Clue. New York: Queens Museum of Art, 2008.

Reboot: The Third Chengdu Biennale. Chengdu: Chengdu Contemporary Art Museum, 2007.

Re-do China. New York: Ethan Cohen Fine Arts, 2003.

Reinventing Tradition in a New World: The Arts of Gu Wenda, Wang Mansheng, Xu Bing and Zhang Hongtu. Pennsylvania: Schmucker Art Gallery, 2004.

Revolution. New York: China Square Publishing Inc., 2007.

R/evolution. Taipei: Tina Keng Gallery, 2009.

The Revolution Continues: New Art from China. London: Saatchi Gallery, 2008.

Roots to Reality II: Alternative Visions. New York: Alliance for Asian American Arts and Culture, and Henry Street Settlement, 1986.

Selections: Aljira & Artists Space. New York: Artists Space, 1990.

Shuffling the Deck: The Collection Reconsidered. Princeton: Princeton University Art Museum, 2003.

Syncretism: The Art of the XXI Century. New York: Alternative Museum, 1991.

Tiananmen Memorial Art Exhibit. New York: Congressional Human Rights Foundation, 1990.

Trading Place: Contemporary Art Museum. Taipei: Museum of Contemporary Art, 2005.

Transcultural New Jersey: Diverse Artists Shaping Culture and Communities. New Jersey: Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, 2004.

Transience: Chinese Experimental Art at the End of the Twentieth Century. Chicago: The David and Alfred Smart Museum, 1999.

Travelers Between Cultures: Contemporary Chinese Artists in New York. New Jersey: Visual Art Center of New Jersey, 2006.

Unknown/Infinity: Culture and Identity in the Digital Age. New York: Taipei Gallery, 2001.

Urban Archives: Happy Together. New York: The Bronx Museum of the Arts, 2011. 

Word and Meaning: Six Contemporary Chinese Artists. University at Buffalo Art Gallery, 2000.

Works by Zhang Hongtu. Hong Kong: The HKUST Center for the Arts, 1996.

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