NAOMI SAVAGE

Unexplored Limits

 

April – June, 2020

 

Naomi Savage was a highly innovative photographer, who regarded the darkroom as a laboratory where she could invent new and exciting techniques that began with photography but expanded the capability of the medium to new and previously unexplored limits.  She was the niece of Man Ray and studied with him for a brief period in Hollywood, California.  It was he who taught her that photography had no boundaries.  “The darkroom,” he told her, “was a place to make fearless tries at whatever images came to mind.”  She followed that advice throughout her career, being the first to display metal-plate photoengravings (customarily used as a means by which to make prints) as finished works of art, thereby causing the very medium of photography to be redefined.  She first showed her work in the 1950s and 1960s in group exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and was represented in the 1970s to mid-1980s by the prestigious gallery of Lee Witkin in New York City.  Her work can be found in some of the most distinguished museums and art institutions in the United States: The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Princeton University Art Museum, The Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona, etc.  When digital photography emerged in the 1990s, Savage embraced it completely, considering it as a new and revolutionary means by which to engage in an even greater diversity of experimentation.  The influence of Man Ray appears throughout her work, both formally, thematically and conceptually, as she fully embraced his position that art follows no rules and is without limitation, thereby, in the case of Naomi Savage, resulting in a range of work that stretched the limits of photography.

 

Due to the ongoing situation with COVID-19, Baahng Gallery is postponing upcoming exhibitions and programs. In the meantime, we will be providing series of online exhibitions and announcements.  For information about the exhibitions or the works, please contact us at inquiries@baahng.com

Related:

Naomi Savage, Artists All [Duchamp/Man Ray/David Savage]

NAOMI SAVAGE

Unexplored Limits
April - June, 2020

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MAN RAY

April – June, 2020

A l’Heure de l’observatoire—les amoureux, 1970 depicts Man Ray’s most famous painting, A l’Heure de l’observatoire—les amoureux, 1932-34: a pair of enormous female lips detached from a visage and floating mysteriously over the city of Paris.  They were the lips of Lee Miller, Man Ray’s lover who left him just before he embarked upon the painting of this picture and, thus, historians have understood it to serve as his memorial to her or his personal purgative of loss.  Whatever its motive, with this one image Man Ray has succeeded in capturing the essence of Surrealism: an image displaced from its natural environment and placed within a magical setting, while at the same time evoking the depiction of a dream.

 

Due to the ongoing situation with COVID-19, Baahng Gallery is postponing upcoming exhibitions and programs. In the meantime, we will be providing series of online exhibitions and announcements.  For information about the exhibitions or the works, please contact us at inquiries@baahng.com

Related:

Man Ray, A l’Heure de l’observatoire—les amoureux,

MAN RAY

A l’Heure de l’observatoire—les amoureux
April - June, 2020

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SOPHIE MATISSE

Be Back In 5

April – June, 2020

 

……………..In the persuasive likenesses of well-known paintings, but all rendered without any living thing in them; The Mona Lisa without Mona; Velazquez’ Las Meninas as a vast empty room, Sophie produced some 20 paintings in all.  Completely denuded of their human inhabitants by Jan Vermeer, Pablo Picasso, Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Jean-August-Dominique Ingres, Claude Monet, Winslow Homer, including by Gustave Courbet, Paul Gauguin, Edward Hopper, Charles Willson Peale, — most notably — her great- grandfathers, Marcel Duchamp and Henri Matisse……………………..

 

Due to the ongoing situation with COVID-19, Baahng Gallery is postponing upcoming exhibitions and programs. In the meantime, we will be providing series of online exhibitions and announcements.  For information about the exhibitions or the works, please contact us at inquiries@baahng.com

Related:

SophieMatisse at the Art Newspaper

Sophie Matisse was interviewed by BBC TWO on “Becoming Matisse”

Broadcasted on Saturday, April 25, 2020, 9:15pm - 10:15pm.
Sophie Matisse, Nighthawks

SOPHIE MATISSE

Be Back in 5
April - June, 2020

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JANET TAYLOR PICKETT

More than One Way Home

April – June, 2020

……………………….“Throughout my development as an artist, I began to recognize ‘home’ to be a metaphor; an idea for finding my visual voice.  The ‘home’ of personal geography, the self-landscape of memory revealed, become the journey from which the artworks in this exhibition have been created.”……………………………………….

 

Due to the ongoing situation with COVID-19, Baahng Gallery is postponing upcoming exhibitions and programs. In the meantime, we will be providing series of online exhibitions and announcements.  For information about the exhibitions or the works, please contact us at inquiries@baahng.com

Related:

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BRIAN DAILEY: WORDS: A Global Conversation

Baahng Gallery is pleased to present WORDS: A Global Conversation, Brian Dailey’s creative summation of 7-year odyssey (2012-2019) that took him to 120 countries.  Working in an international geopolitical landscape undergoing tumultuous and historic changes over the evolution of this project, Dailey visited public and private venues on all 7 continents.  The exhibition is the inauguralof the project in its entirety and showcases WORDS MULTIMEDIA installation and WORDS ON WORDS, a 13 lenticular- print series.  This exhibition is Dailey’s second solo show with the gallery and will run from February 11 thru March 17, 2020, accompanied with opening reception on Tuesday, February 11, 6-8pm, and Artist Talk on March 3, Tuesday, 5:30pm. 

 

WORDS is the artist’s investigation into the impact of globalization and its effect on key human structures of language, society, culture, and environment.In each country, Dailey set up his camera with green-screen backdrop and invited random individuals.  Participants were asked 13 words in their native languages: peace, war, love, environment, freedom, religion, democracy, government, happiness, socialism, capitalism, future, and United States.  Each person responded—in a single word—with a first impression andselected a background flag reflecting his or her societal allegiance.  WORDS MULTIMEDIA is a time-based artand engages the viewers in present day issues while invoking a communal sense among global citizens.  In WORDS on WORDS, distinct single-word responses are layered in an immeasurable array of colors enhanced by the lenticular 3D effect. Interjecting his voice in a collaborative manner with the project’s participants, Dailey creates iconoclastic yet playful statements reminiscent of Dada and Surrealist word play. 

 

Born 1951 in California, Brian Dailey earned MFA from Otis Art Institute in 1975 and Ph.D. from University of Southern California in 1987 and participated in the pioneering creative experimentation defining the prolific artistic milieu in California in this era.  His early career launched him on a path that—before his full circle back to his arts in 2008—took him through a twenty-year interlude working on arms control and international security.  These unusual experiences were a fertile source of inspiration in his idiosyncratic art practice. With dual citizenship of USA and New Zealand, He lives and works in the Washington D.C. and in Woodstock, Virginia.  His selected solo exhibitions include at Katzen Arts Center, American University Museum in Washington D.C., in 2018 and his mid-career retrospective at Bulgaria’s National Art Gallery in Sofia in 2014. The evocative videoJIKAI was screened on multiple synchronized monitors in New York City in February, 2014, as the featured video in the Times Square Midnight Moment series; a project of ART PRODUCTION FUND. Brian Dailey is represented by Baahng Gallery. 

 

Brian Dailey

WORDS: A Global Conversation

A solo exhibition by Brian Dailey

February 11 – March 17, 2020

 

Opening reception

6-8PM, Tuesday February 11, 2020

 

Artist Talk:

5:30PM, Tuesday March 3, 2020

 

 

Brian Dailey, WORDS ON WORDS

WORDS on WORDS, 2019

Set of 13, Solos, Lenticular Prints 20 x 40 in, 24 x 48 in
50.8 x 101.6 cm, 70 x 122 cm edition of 25 plus 5AP’s each unique

WORDS on WORDS, a print series of the project, comprises 13 lenticular works. Distinct single-word responses derived from the answers of the more than 3000 participants in the project are layered throughout the panels in an immeasurable array of colors enhanced by the 3D effect. Interjecting his voice in a collaborative manner with the project’s participants from 134 countries, the artist combined these individual answers into two- or three-word phrases to create iconoclastic yet playful statements reminiscent of Dada and Surrealist word play.

 

Brian Dailey, Tous les Mots

Tous les Mots, 2018
Inkjet on museum etching paper 13 solos each unique
18 x 22 in
46 x 58.5 cm
edition of 25 plus 5AP’s

Tous les Mots, is a play on the French expression tous les monde, which in its most literal sense translates as all the people in the world. By interjecting the French word for words—mots—it creates a double entendre highlighting both the global and individual voice of the project. The series encapsulates the very essence of this series in that every word uttered by the nearly 3,000 participants is represented in one of the prints corresponding to each of the thirteen words. This print series gives voice to each and every individual who engaged in the WORDS endeavor, the various responses were calibrated and scaled to reflect the frequency in which they were articulated – forming dynamic word clouds.

 

Related:

Brian Dailey, WORDS: A Global Conversation

BRIAN DAILEY: WORDS: A Global Conversation

February 11 - March 17, 2020
Brian Dailey, America in Color

BRIAN DAILEY: Polytropos

November 1 - December 15, 2018
Artist Talk with Brian Dailey

Artist Talk with Brian Dailey

Moderated by Wendy A. Grossman
November 8, 2018
Brian Dailey's "WORDS" and "American in Color", installation view at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Arts Center

Brian Dailey at The Rachel M. Schlesinger Arts Center

In collaboration with the Department of Photography and Media of the Alexandria Campus of NOVA
January 11 - February 8, 2019
perform_baahng_0113

PERFORMATIVE

Brian Dailey, Miryana Todorova, Rae-BK
July 17 - August 15, 2018

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ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

Baahng Gallery is pleased to present I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX, the gallery’s inaugural solo exhibition of the highly celebrated works of Zhang Hongtu, a Chinese-born, New York-based artist and forerunner of the Chinese “Political Pop” art movement.  The exhibition will be on view at the gallery from September 27 through November 8, with an opening reception with the artist to be held on Friday, September 27, from 6 to 8 pm.  

 

To dare to mate a horse with an ox is to dare to break down the zygotic barriers that maintain the separation of species.  This notion of doing the impossible and breaking down barriers has been the lodestar of Zhang Hongtu’s life and five decade-long career.  As a Muslim outsider in China, then as a Chinese exile in America, through his works, he has continually sought to disintegrate dividing walls in culture, politics, and time.  His works involve thoughtful juxtapositions of critique with humor, and the appropriation of images of authority figures and cultural icons, for the purpose of deflating the power of such formidably divisive influences.  While each work captures and contemplates a multi-layered discourse on competing ideas, the exhibition as a whole unexpectedly proposes universality and relevancy.   

 

I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX highlights selected works from Zhang’s series Shansui, Political Pop, and Van Gogh/Bodhidharma.  Van Gogh/Bodhidharma consists of 39 ink paintings created over the course of seven years, 2007-2014.  They are the Van Gogh “self-portraits” merged into the style of the classical Zen portraits of Buddhist monk Bodhidharma.  His morphing of Van Gogh and Bodhidharma into one is a remarkable display of the artist’s masterful ability to dissolve distinctions between two icons.  Also on view are:  Bada! Bada!!-11, #2, 2011, a lopsided map of China facing a mob of angry fish; Walking Monkey, 2016, a warning on a disrupted ecosystem; Landscape, Out of the Focus, 2011, a questioning of the assumption of near-sightedness; Long Live Chairman Mao Series, 1987-1995; Zodiac Figures, 2002; Mai Dang Lao, 2002; and Six-Pack of Kekou-Kele, 2002.

 

Zhang Hongtu was born in Gansu, China, in 1943. He attended the Central Academy of Arts and Crafts in Beijing 1964-1969, moved to New York in 1982, and attended Art Students League 1982-1986.  Selected solo exhibitions include at Queens Museum, Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art, Kansas, the Connecticut College Charles E. Shain Library, The Bronx Museum of Fine Arts, Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts, Taiwan.  Selected group exhibitions at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museu Picasso, Spain, Brooklyn Museum, Wexner Center for the Arts, Ohio, Princeton University Art Museum, Israel Museum, Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark, El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Cuba, The Hall for Contemporary Art, Hamburg, Germany, Kunst und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, Germany, and Taipei Fine Arts Museum, Taiwan.

ZHANG HONGTU

I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

 

September 27 – November 16, 2019

 

Opening reception with the artist

6-8pm, Friday September 27

 
Artist Talk on Van Gogh/Bodhidharma: 1-3pm, Saturday November 16
Related:
Zhang Hongtu, Long Live Chairman Mao Series

ZHANG HONGTU: I DARE TO MATE A HORSE WITH AN OX

September 27 - November 16, 2019
Zhang Hongtu at Art and China after 1989

Zhang Hongtu in ART AND CHINA AFTER 1989: THEATER OF THE WORLD

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York
October 6, 2017 - January 7, 2018
The Red Door by Zhang Hongtu

NOBUO SEKINE AND ZHANG HONGTU: TWO ROCKS

September 20 - October 21, 2017
Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu, Beach Museum of Art, Kansas State University

Culture Mixmaster Zhang Hongtu at The Mariana Kistler Beach Museum of Art

Kansas State University
September 25 - December 22, 2018
Zhang Hongtu by the Mercury News

Zhang’s “Mixmaster” exhibit blends his Chinese, American backgrounds

Review and interview by Megan Moser, The Manhattan Mercury
October 7, 2018
Zhang Hongtu's "Mao, After Picasso" at Hirschl & Adler

Zhang Hongtu in The Masters: Art Students League Teachers and Their Students

At Hirschl & Adler Modern
October 18 - December 1, 2018
Zhang Hongtu

International artist Zhang Hongtu debuts first solo Midwest show at K-State

Review by Savanna Maue, THE TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL
September 22, 2018

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VERTIGO

Vertigo

 

Works on Paper

 

July 19 – August 23, 2019

 

By Appointment

 

……………………………..A Note to Paula | Art Volant | Candide | CS-08 Crossroads |Darwin in Contact with Nature | Expulsion and Nativity | Frankensteinʼs Monster |Further I II III IV | IT IS AS POSSIBLE TO HAVE A SPACE WITH TABLES FOR 88 PEOPLE AS IT IS TO HAVE A SPACE WITH TABLE FOR NO ONE | Kites | Mao, After Picasso | Mesostics: Earth, Air, Fire, Water | Nina Simone | Ovid Resting in Nature | Phase Conception: Spring Sea | Stephen Hawking | The Train | T.E. Lawrence Returns to Nature | Van Gogh in Contact with Nature………………………………..

 

 

Joseph Beuys
Carol Bove
Mario Merz
Nobuo Sekine
Josh Smith

Categories: exhibitions

JACK SAL: Re/Vision

ZONE: CONTEMPORARY ART begins 2009 with “Jack Sal: Re/Vision,” a long overdue exhibition for a multi-faceted artist. His work appears in the many permanent collections, including the Museum of Modern Art and the International Center of Photography in New York City, the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum Moderner Kunst in Vienna. He is a respected figure in Europe, where he has mounted a series of remarkable site-specific installations. He has collaborated with William Wegman and Sol Lewitt and exhibited along side Sigmar Polke and Nan Goldin. But Sal’s work remains largely unfamiliar to the American public.

 

ZONE is presenting a cross section of Sal’s work, including a chapel-like space of large-scale paintings, using gesso and silk surgical tape, created specifically for this installation. Minimalist yet profoundly humanistic, his work has a handmade look, which carries over into a group of smaller paintings and works on paper.

 

Sal is intensely aware of the temporal dimension of his work, in general, and this exhibition, in particular. He sees this new year as a “moment when the demarcation of change is upon mankind….” and it is the engagement of culture with such conditions that make up the conceptual language of the works created for Re/Vision. These art works refer to their own making and ultimately refer to the tabula rasa of this very important moment. Temperamentally, he has much in common with Terry Riley, the composer of seminal works of musical minimalism such as the serenely joyous “In C”. Like Riley, an unassuming figure who never crossed over into mainstream success, Sal works with pared-down idioms, avoiding epic emotions and climaxes, and finding lyrical grace in repetition on an intimate scale. In “Minor/Key” Sal makes an oblique musical reference, isolating an ebony piano key and enshrining it in a box.

 

While he sees marking as a basic artistic act, Sal also incorporates the natural processes inherent in some of his materials. A celebrated photographer, he uses photo-printing paper to capture light and has revived the cliché-verre technique used by nineteenth-century pioneers in the medium. He slices lead plates and allows them to weather naturally: the veining coalesces into landscape-like patterns. These small, square panels provide a dark counterpoint to the predominantly white works in the exhibition. Using a relatively simple palette, Sal explores a wide range of materials and ideas, offering a fresh vision of the art experience

JACK SAL: Re/Vision

January 22 – February 28, 2009

 

Opening reception

6-8pm, Thursday January 22

 
Related:
Artist Talk with Jack Sal

Art/&/Memory: The Work of Jack Sal

Alessandro Cassin, Lyle Rexer and Jack Sal
February 4, 2010
Jack Sal: Re/Vision, installation view

JACK SAL: Re/Vision

January 22 - February 28, 2009
whitehot magazine

WHITEHOT Magazine on Jack Sal: “Re/Vision”

Thomas Butter interviews Jack Sal
January 2009

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PASHA RADETZKI: Crossed House

ZONE: CONTEMPORARY ART is proud to present Pasha Radetzki in his first solo exhibition in New York. The exhibition showcases installation, sculpture, paintings, and drawings accompanied by sound. The concept of trans-space is manifest in the works on view and drawing on the artist’s childhood memories and heritage.

 

Crossed House is an interactive environment where a large-scale sculpture Cross cuts through a house. Viewers are invited to pass through the cross embodying themselves in the regeneration process of the site’s four cardinal directions. The installation adopts the Slavic nesting Doll within the Doll, Matryoshka construction tradition to present the house in all its dimensions, expanded and interconnected. This confirms the artist’s notion of “socium”: the micro-macro form coexists and interrelates, as there are multiple houses built in the space of one.

 

From the Republic of Belarus, the artist since 1999 has been based in New York. Pasha Radetzki has exhibited in Germany, Moscow, Spain, Mexico, South Korea and Taiwan. His works are included in the public and private collections of Exit Art, Moscow House of Photography, Belarus Museum of National History, and Faro Disegni inRome. In 2002 he was a recipient of an international ArtsLink Projects Award for installation from CEC International Partners, New York. Numerous fieldwork projects have taken the artist to the tribal areas of Mynamar and Laos, the Amazon delta, the Himalayan western region, Andean Puna, and Western China. Pasha Radetzki’s art reviews have appeared in The Village Voiceand New York Arts Magazine.

Crossed House

A solo exhibition by Pasha Radetzki

March 5 – 28, 2009

 

Opening reception

6-8pm, Thursday March 12

 

 

Categories: exhibitions

Material Matters: A Poetics of Possibilities

Exhibition guest curated by Dr. Howard Risatti, critic and Chair, Department of Craft/Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University

Zone: Chelsea Center for the Arts will present the work of a group of established artists and their young, emerging counterparts, all of whom work primarily in traditional Craft materials, but without relying on function as their primary support. 

 

In an art world in which Craft materials are regularly used in the manner of Fine Art (e.g., Rosemarie Trockel’s knitting and Jeff Koons’ slip-cast ceramics), traditional distinctions based on material alone hardly seem significant.  Material Matters: A Poetics of Possibilities features a wide range of objects in typical Craft materials that challenge conventional notions of Craft and explore the sensibilities guiding Craft disciplines. 

 

Craft has always involved a dialogue between material, form, and technique resulting in beautifully made objects that allow material to co-exist in itself. While few works in the exhibition are functional in nature, they all tend to have features that express the special nature of Craft.  Works included in this exhibition demonstrate that cross-cultural, global affinities in form, material, technique, and concepts have long been a part of Craft. 

 

Moreover, Craft generally adheres to an idea of the object as personally scaled and suitable for the domestic realm; thus out-sized, museum-scaled objects tend to be avoided.  In place of the grand, public gesture common to Fine Art, Craft works tend to be more intimate and personal in scale and sentiment–more like chamber music than grand opera. Because Craft objects invite touch, interactive qualities of “feel,” weight, and balance are part of their intimate aesthetic appeal.

Material Matters: A Poetics of Possibilities

An Exhibition of Art in Craft Media

Exhibition guest curated by Dr. Howard Risatti, critic and Chair, Department of Craft/Material Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University

 

June 30 – July 23, 2005

 

Opening Reception

6-8pm, Thursday, June 30

 

MATERIAL MATTERS: A POETICS OF POSSIBILITIES

 An Exhibition of objects in Craft Media

by Dr. Howard Risatti

 

        Most of the artists in this exhibition engage a wide range of materials traditionally associated with Craft–for example, among the more established artists, Jack Wax works in glass, Allan Rosenbaum in ceramic, Douglas Finkel in wood, James Meyer in metal, and John Hawthorne in fiber.  Because of this, they would be identified as “Craft artists.”  However, in an art world in which Craft materials are regularly being used in the manner of Fine Art, distinctions based on material alone hardly seem important any longer.  If they were, where would we place Rosemarie Trockel with her knitting, Mike Kelly with his stuffed animals, and Jeff Koons with his slip-cast ceramics?  What is important about material, as this exhibition demonstrates, is how it is ultimately used in the service of artistic expression. 

        When it comes to Craft, most people, whether consciously or not, still assume that Craft objects exhibit certain features, the most prominent of which is function.  This exhibition is decidedly not about function–in fact few works in it are actually functional, not even Bill Hammersley’s benches, Jason Hackett’s urns, or Adam Welch’s platters.  Rather, it is an exploration of the special meanings and sensibilities inherent in Craft.  For instance, embracing the global (currently so evident in the art world) is hardly new to Craft since Craft-disciplines have always had cross-cultural affinities in form, material, technique, and concepts. Artists in this exhibition such as Hyo-in Kim and Ji-Wan Joo exploit Korean and Western ceramics, similarly, Lydia Thompson’s work displays elements of African design, and Susan Iverson employs Peruvian weaving methods. 

        Craft objects tend to be relatively small and avoid the monumental scale implicitly invited by spacious contemporary museums. Ceramists Sergei Isupov and Suk-Jin Choi, fabric artists Nicole Haimbach and Maria Kovacs, and woodworkers Kate Hudnall and Travis Townsend, all create objects more closely scaled to the body than to monumental architecture. Their art works do not require large, formal exhibition spaces, but are quite at home in more personal and familial surroundings. 

        Craft objects tend to direct attention to the domestic realm rather than  public spaces, something evident in J. D. Garn’s ceramics and Cindy Myron’s metal work. They also tend to speak intimately and personally; more akin to chamber music than grand opera.  Moreover, in keeping with their sense of scale and setting, the concern with material in Craft includes fragility and interactive tactile sensations which, after all, are redolent with domestic life’s interpersonal and bodily relationships; such features are apparent in the glass works of Emilio Santini, Fumiaki Odajima, and Tim Wagner and the ceramics of Fiona Ross. 

        The Craft object speaks in another voice, one that compliments rather than contradicts Fine Art.  In doing so it suggests a cross-cultural understanding of personal space that is rich with poetic possibility.

Howard Risatti is Emeritus Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Theory in the Department of Art History at Virginia Commonwealth University where he also was Chair of the Department of Craft/Material Studies from 2001-05.  Before receiving his PhD in art history, he earned BM and MM Degrees in music and is ABD in music theory and composition.  

 

His writings on art and craft have appeared in various journals including the Art Journal, Artforum, New Art Examiner, Artscribe, Latin American Art, The Chronicle of Higher Education, The Woman’s Art Journal, Art Criticism, The Studio Potter, Sculpture, and Ceramic Art & Perception.  Most recently he wrote on Jackie Matisse’s “Collaborations in Art and Science” for Sculpture Magazine, on “Contemporary American Ceramic Trends” for Korean Ceramics Monthly, and on the ceramic sculpture of Suk-Jin Choi for Ceramics Monthly. 

 

He has presented numerous papers on various subjects including functional crafts at the 2003 Cheongju Craft Biennial in Korea; Jackie Matisse’s virtual reality kites at the “Art and New Technologies” conference in Chalon sur Soane, France; Leo Steinberg’s “Contemporary Art and the Plight of its Public” at the 2005 College Art Conference in Atlanta; and Craft versus Design at the 2005 Society of North American Goldsmiths’ conference in Cleveland.

 

His first book was New Music Vocabulary and appeared in 1975 (University of Illinois Press); Postmodern Perspectives: Issues in Contemporary Art appeared in 1990 and the 2nd edition in 1998 (Prentice Hall).  The Mountain Lake Workshops: Artists in Locale (1996, Anderson Gallery & VA Tech Foundation) ) accompanied the exhibition that he curated of the same title.  In 1998 he co-authored with Kenneth Trapp Skilled Work: American Craft in the Renwick Gallery (Smithsonian Institution Press).  His latest book, A Theory of Craft: Function and Aesthetic Expression (UNC Press), is scheduled to appear in Fall 2007. 

Categories: exhibitions